Tasmania's Convicts

Tasmania's Convicts - Alison Alexander | 2020-eala-conference.org PDF, TXT, FB2. EPUB. MOBI. The book was written on 2021. Look for a book on 2020-eala-conference.org.

INFORMATION

AUTHOR
Alison Alexander
DIMENSION
3,60 MB
FILE NAME
Tasmania's Convicts.pdf
ISBN
3046479808583

DESCRIPTION

To the convicts arriving in Van Diemen's Land, it must have felt as though they'd been sent to the very ends of the earth. In Tasmania's Convicts Alison Alexander tells the history of the men and women transported to what became one of Britain's most notorious convict colonies. Following the lives of dozens of convicts and their families, she uncovers stories of success, failure, and everything in between. While some suffered harsh conditions, most served their time and were freed, becoming ordinary and peaceful citizens. Yet over the decades, a terrible stigma became associated with the convicts, and they and the whole colony went to extraordinary lengths to hide it. The majority of Tasmanians today have convict ancestry, whether they know it or not. While the public stigma of its convict past has given way to a contemporary fascination with colonial history, Alison Alexander debates whether the convict past lingers deep in the psyche of white Tasmania.

The data was sourced from records of convicts held at the Tasmanian Archives and Heritage Office, various scholarly datasets, and data contributed from ... 1846: Convict transportation to Tasmania suspended until 1848; 1846: Tasmania becomes first Australian colony to enact legislation to protect native animals; 1847: Britain orders closure of NSW convict establishment and transfer of remaining prisoners to Tasmania ; 1847: Big Hobart meeting petitions Queen Victoria for end to transportation; 1847: Wybalenna Aboriginal settlement at Flinders ... To the convicts arriving in Van Diemen's Land' it must have felt as though they'd been sent to the very ends of the earth. In Tasmania's Convicts Alison Alexander tells the history of the men and women transported to what became one of Britain's most notorious convict colonies.

Built 1841 at Sunderland. Wood barque of 502 Tons.

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